Is Avocado Toast Good For Weight Loss? A Nutritionist’s Insights 2023

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Reviewed by Sarah Glinski
is avocado toast good for weight loss
Avocado toast is nutrient-dense and high in fiber. Photo: Ba Le Ho

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If you’re following health accounts on your socials, you probably can’t escape seeing at least one picture of avocado toast when your feed pops open.

Plus, when it comes to youth who are constantly on social media and searching for things like how to lose weight fast for teens, you might be a bit concerned. Are we getting all the facts?

Is avocado toast good for weight loss and health, or is it just a trendy photo op?

Is Avocado Toast Good For Losing Weight?

It depends. A healthy diet that leads to weight loss requires a calorie deficit, so consuming the right portions of avocado is important for weight management.

While avocados and bread can be full of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and healthy fats, they are fairly calorie-dense due to their high monounsaturated fat content. And they are low in protein, a macronutrient that promotes satiety and is thermogenic.

However, that doesn’t mean avocado toast can’t be a part of a healthy diet for weight loss. The monounsaturated fatty acids are thermogenic, and the high fiber content is satiating, making up for a low protein content. Plus, when paired with protein, like eggs or salmon, it can make a complete meal that leaves you full for hours.

Is Avocado Toast Good For Weight Loss?

Almost any food can be part of a balanced diet for weight loss. Nutrient-dense breads and avocados are no exception. Together, they make an outstanding balance of carbs and healthy fats.

The carbs from bread offer quick energy, while the healthy fats and fiber from the avocado can help you feel fuller. This can curb cravings and prevent snacking or overeating. And the low saturated fat content makes it a choice acceptable by the[1] American Heart Association.

The key, however, is moderation. As long as you stick to healthy portion sizes and eat a diet full of varied, nutritious foods, you can lose weight.

One serving of avocado a day[2] is healthy and may help with weight loss — which is about one-third of a medium avocado[3] or 50 grams.

If you’re still unsure and wondering, “Is avocado toast good for losing weight?” just look at the science. One study of 105 adults who were overweight or obese found that eating one fresh Hass avocado daily helped them lose their belly fat. Women lost more visceral fat[4] than men. Visceral fat surrounds your internal organs and is associated with health risks like diabetes and certain cancers.

Benefits Of Avocado Toast For Weight Loss

is avocado toast good for weight loss
Avocados are delicious and full of health benefits. Photo: BearFotos/Shutterstock

Avocado toast recipes aren’t just tasty — they can help with weight loss and total body health due to their nutrient content and ease of use.

Versatile

One of the hardest things about eating healthier is not knowing what to eat. Getting bored with our food can make ordering at restaurants or falling back into old unhealthy habits all the more appealing.

Quick And Easy

With our busy lives, meals that are quick and easy have become the go-to. With avocado mash, your breakfast can be ready within minutes. It’s easy, reliable, and even possible to make at work if you’re running behind.

Improved Gut Health

Avocados are high in fiber, which promotes a healthier gut microbiome.[5] One 50-gram serving of avocado has 3.4 grams of dietary fiber, which is approximately 11% of your daily[3] recommended fiber intake.

Fiber promotes gut health and weight loss by nourishing the good bacteria in your gut. This leads to better digestion, improved metabolism, enhanced immune function, and reduced inflammation. It also adds bulk to your stool and can help make you more regular, which might help you lose water weight.

Combined, these factors can play a positive role in weight loss. A review showed that a health and wellness supplement containing probiotics could prevent food intake triggers[6] that lead to weight gain. Another study showed that dietary fiber promotes weight loss[7] and adherence to a calorie-restricted diet.

If you’re curious about how much fiber per day to lose weight is needed, experts recommend eating 25 to 35 grams[8] of fiber per day.

Abundant In Healthy Fat

If you’re wondering, “Is avocado toast fattening?” The answer is yes — but in the best way possible. And the term fattening is deceiving since eating avocados in moderation will not add excess body fat. Plus, monounsaturated fat[9] was shown as thermogenic in animal studies, thus promoting fat burning.

One serving of this fruit has 5 grams of monounsaturated fats or MUFA. Major organizations like the WHO recommend replacing trans and saturated fats with MUFA to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease[10] and inflammation.

Some research also indicates that oleic acid, the main MUFA found in avocados,[3] aids weight loss by promoting feeling full.[11]

Rich In Vitamins And Minerals 

Eating avocados is associated with better diet quality and increased intake of nutrients. An analysis from National Health and Nutrition[12] showed that people who ate avocados generally ate more fruits and vegetables and fewer added sugars. They also had higher intakes of vitamins E and K, as well as magnesium and potassium.

If you want to lose weight with insulin resistance, vitamin K[13] can help regulate blood sugar and improve insulin resistance.

Tips For Making & Eating

is avocado toast good for weight loss
Adding protein-rich toppings makes avocado toast more filling. Photo: sweet marshmallo/Shutterstock

Healthy food shouldn’t be eaten just because it’s healthy — it’s meant to be enjoyed! Here are ways to make your avocado toast tasty while supporting your weight loss goals:

Choose Nutrient-Dense Bread

Start experimenting with different nutrient-dense slices of bread to find one you love. White bread tends to spike blood sugar,[14] which can lead to cravings.[15] Aim for whole-grain bread with interesting additions like nuts and seeds. Experimenting with different whole-grain breads can also prevent food boredom.

Add Protein-Rich Toppings

There are plenty of tasty protein-rich toppings to alternate and choose from, such as:

  • Nuts.
  • Seeds.
  • Eggs. 
  • Beans.
  • Tempeh.
  • Chicken. 
  • Hummus. 
  • Edamame. 

If you’re just looking for extra flavor, try adding herbs and spices. rosemary, garlic powder, thyme, or dill with salmon are great choices. Also, microgreens from broccoli, watercress, or radishes can pack a punch of flavor and nutrition.

Watch Your Portions

Taking the time to eat mindfully and serve appropriate portions is key for balanced eating and keeping your calories in check. Whether a small handful of raw nuts or half a cup of Greek yogurt, anything can be included if you’re mindful of moderation.

Conclusion

Eating avocado toast is popular for a reason. It contains healthy fats, fiber, and essential vitamins and minerals. Plus, there are plenty of toppings to keep you from getting bored, like nuts, seeds, or microgreens.

The key to eating avocado toast for weight loss is moderation to stay within your daily caloric goals and add protein to create a complete meal. While making a pretty plate to post on socials might be a motivator, stay mindful of your portions and add ingredients that can keep you fuller for longer.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is avocado toast good for losing belly fat?

Avocado toast can be part of a healthy diet that may lead to losing belly fat as long as it’s eaten in moderation.

Are eggs and avocado toast good for weight loss?

Yes, eggs and avocado toast can support weight loss. It’s a dish full of vitamins, minerals, fiber, healthy fats, and protein, which are key to a healthy diet.

How many calories are in 2 slices of avocado toast?

Two slices of avocado toast can range from approximately 200 to 500 calories depending on your portion size and the type of bread used.

Is it OK to eat an avocado a day?

Eating an avocado daily can be healthy using portion control. Some avocados are much larger than others. Aim for one serving size daily, which is about one-third of a medium avocado or 50 grams.

+ 15 Sources

EHproject has strict sourcing guidelines and relies on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We work mostly with peer-reviewed studies to ensure accurate information. We avoid using tertiary references. You can learn more about how we ensure our content is accurate and current by reading our editorial policy.

  1. Pacheco, L.S., Li, Y., Rimm, E.B., Ann, J., Sun, Q., Rexrode, K.M., Hu, F.B. and Guasch‐Ferré, M. (2022). Avocado Consumption and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in US Adults. Journal of the American Heart Association, [online] 11(7). doi:https://doi.org/10.1161/jaha.121.024014.
  2. Lichtenstein, A.H., Kris‐Etherton, P.M., Petersen, K.S., Matthan, N.R., Barnes, S., Vitolins, M.Z., Li, Z., Sabaté, J., Rajaram, S., Chowdhury, S., Davis, K.M., Galluccio, J., Gilhooly, C.H., Legro, R.S., Li, J., Lovato, L., Perdue, L.H., Petty, G., Rasmussen, A. and Segovia‐Siapco, G. (2022). Effect of Incorporating 1 Avocado Per Day Versus Habitual Diet on Visceral Adiposity: A Randomized Trial. Journal of the American Heart Association, [online] 11(14). doi:https://doi.org/10.1161/jaha.122.025657.
  3. Ford, N.B. and Liu, A. (2020). The Forgotten Fruit: A Case for Consuming Avocado Within the Traditional Mediterranean Diet. Frontiers in Nutrition, [online] 7. doi:https://doi.org/10.3389/fnut.2020.00078.
  4. Khan, N.A., Edwards, C.G., Thompson, S.V., Hannon, B.A., Burke, S., Walk, A.M., Richard W.A. Mackenzie, Reeser, G.E., Fiese, B.H., Burd, N.A. and Holscher, H.D. (2021). Avocado Consumption, Abdominal Adiposity, and Oral Glucose Tolerance Among Persons with Overweight and Obesity. Journal of Nutrition, [online] 151(9), pp.2513–2521. doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxab187.
  5. Fu, J., Zheng, Y., Gao, Y. and Wang, X. (2022). Dietary Fiber Intake and Gut Microbiota in Human Health. Microorganisms, [online] 10(12), pp.2507–2507. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/microorganisms10122507.
  6. Aoun, A., Darwish, F. and Hamod, N. (2020). The Influence of the Gut Microbiome on Obesity in Adults and the Role of Probiotics, Prebiotics, and Synbiotics for Weight Loss. Journal of Food Science and Nutrition, [online] 25(2), pp.113–123. doi:https://doi.org/10.3746/pnf.2020.25.2.113.
  7. Miketinas, D., Bray, G.A., Beyl, R.A., Ryan, D.H., Sacks, F.M. and Champagne, C.M. (2019). Fiber Intake Predicts Weight Loss and Dietary Adherence in Adults Consuming Calorie-Restricted Diets: The POUNDS Lost (Preventing Overweight Using Novel Dietary Strategies) Study. Journal of Nutrition, [online] 149(10), pp.1742–1748. doi:https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/nxz117.
  8. Barber, T.M., Kabisch, S., Andreas and Weickert, M.O. (2020). The Health Benefits of Dietary Fibre. Nutrients, [online] 12(10), pp.3209–3209. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/nu12103209.
  9. Fosch, A., María Rodríguez-García, Miralpeix, C., Sebastián Zagmutt, Maite Larrañaga, Ana Cristina Reguera, Jesús García-Chica, Herrero, L., Serra, D., Casals, N. and Rosalía Rodríguez‐Rodríguez (2023). Central Regulation of Brown Fat Thermogenesis in Response to Saturated or Unsaturated Long-Chain Fatty Acids. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, [online] 24(2), pp.1697–1697. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms24021697.
  10. Okobi, O.E., Odoma, V.A., Omolola Okunromade, Olusayo Louise-Oluwasanmi, Blessing Itua, Chinonso Ndubuisi, Ogbeifun, O.E., Nwatamole, B.C., Elimihele, T.A., Adekunle, J.O., Adekunle, A., Babalola, C.P. and Evbayekha, E.O. (2023). Effect of Avocado Consumption on Risk Factors of Cardiovascular Diseases: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Cureus. [online] doi:https://doi.org/10.7759/cureus.41189.
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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jennifer Olejarz is a Certified Nutritionist and Health Counselor specializing in binge and emotional eating, stress management, and mental health. She has almost a decade's worth of experience in the health and wellness field writing health… See More

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