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Best Vegan Multivitamin 2024: 7 Best Options For Vegans

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Reviewed by Maya Frankfurt, PhD
best vegan multivitamin
Vegan multivitamins provide several key nutrients. Photo: Team Design

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Whether your motivations are moral, health-conscious, or both, following a vegan diet has numerous benefits.[1] There is less strain placed on the environment when plant products are produced compared with animal products. Plant-based diets have been associated with lower risks of heart disease, diabetes, and several types of cancer. 

As vegan diets become more popular, it’s important to understand some of the potential nutritional pitfalls. There is the possibility of gaps in important nutrients. A carefully planned, balanced vegan diet can cover these, but dietary supplements are also commonly used to make sure these needs are fulfilled. 

The supplement industry has stepped in to provide a multitude of choices, so how can we find the best vegan multivitamin? Let’s look closer at the nutrients these supplements need to provide, and some helpful ways to ensure you’re picking a quality, reliable product.

7 Best Vegan Multivitamins In 2024

Should Vegans Take Multivitamins?

A common question that arises with any restrictive diet is whether you’re getting all of the essential vitamins and nutrients you need. While it is possible to get enough with careful planning, plant-based diets introduce an increased risk of deficiencies of some key nutrients. A vegan diet may introduce a higher likelihood of being deficient in the following nutrients:[2] 

  • Vitamin B12.
  • Vitamin D. 
  • Eicosapentaenoic acid, or EPA.
  • Docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA.
  • Calcium.
  • Iron.
  • Zinc.
  • Iodine.

Many of these nutrients are provided by meat products, fish, or dairy, highlighting the potential benefits of specifically formulated vegan supplements that cover these gaps. 

Best Vegan Multivitamins In 2024

Future Kind Essential Vegan Multivitamin

Future Kind Essential Vegan Multivitamin

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  • Third-party tested.
  • Good manufacturing practices or GMP certification. 
  • Environmentally conscious.
  • A vegan source of EPA and DHA. 
  • Four essential nutrients are provided; Additional supplements may be recommended.

Future Kind is transparent regarding its manufacturing and supply chain policies, all of which are meant to be environmentally friendly. The product itself is also tested for ingredient integrity and produced in facilities that meet FDA standards. Customer experience and feedback have been mostly positive, and Future Kind is available at a competitive price of a little less than $1 per day. 

A potential concern is related to the lack of variety of ingredients offered. Future Kind includes: 

  • Vitamin D3, 2000 IU. 
  • Vitamin B12, 400 mcg. 
  • EPA 135 mg. 
  • DHA 270 mg.

These doses provide what’s needed for these ingredients, but some individuals may also benefit from calcium supplements or iron supplements to cover additional gaps. Talk with a healthcare professional about your health status to help make sure your supplements are covering your needs. 

Ritual Essential Multivitamin For Women

  • Focus on traceable ingredients. 
  • Third-party tested.
  • GMP-certified facilities.
  • Vegan source of DHA.
  • Iron content is helpful for women’s health. 
  • Four essential nutrients are provided; additional supplements may be recommended. 

Ritual vitamins place a strong emphasis on traceable sources for their ingredients, and their capsules are gluten-free. The manufacturing practices promote a consistent, reliable product. It may be helpful to keep an eye on the price, as sales can bring the price down significantly from the standard price of $33 – Ritual multivitamin for women is available for $19.80 at the time of writing. 

The ingredients that are specifically helpful for the vegan diet include:

  • Vitamin D3, 2000 IU.
  • Vitamin B12, 8 mcg.
  • Iron, 8 mg.
  • DHA, 330 mg.

Several other ingredients provide general nutritional support, including vitamin E, folate, magnesium, boron, and vitamin K. Similar to Future Kind, there are four ingredients beneficial to those seeking a vegan vitamin, and some individuals may benefit from an additional supplement. Vitamin B12 is provided in a smaller dose but does exceed the recommended daily amount. 

Female vegan dieters tend to have higher rates of iron deficiency,[2] so the iron content makes Ritual among the best multivitamins for women’s health. Different age groups have variable needs, so it can also be helpful to consider vitamins tailored to teens or women over the age of 50

Performance Lab NutriGenesis Multi For Men

  • Third-party tested.
  • GMP-certified facilities
  • More complete multivitamin.
  • The price is high, $49 for a 30-day supply.

Performance Lab provides a more standard multivitamin with a total of 26 active ingredients. The nutrients helpful for the vegan diet include: 

  • Vitamin D, 1000 IU. 
  • Vitamin B12, 50 mcg. 
  • Calcium, 18mg. 
  • Iron, 2 mg.
  • Iodine, 150 mcg.
  • Zinc, 15 mg.

The only vegan-related ingredients missing are EPA and DHA, which you can get from omega-3 fish oil supplement alternatives – some supplements source these ingredients from algae.[3] It’s also worth noting that the amounts of calcium and iron are small, so some individuals may still benefit from higher doses of a dedicated calcium or iron supplement, depending on need. 

The inactive ingredients are vegan-friendly and free of major allergens. The remaining active ingredients are: 

  • Vitamin A.
  • Vitamin C.
  • Vitamin E.
  • Vitamin K.
  • Vitamin B1.
  • Vitamin B2.
  • Niacin.
  • Vitamin B6.
  • Folate.
  • Biotin.
  • Pantothenic acid.
  • Magnesium.
  • Selenium.
  • Copper.
  • Manganese.
  • Chromium.
  • Molybdenum.
  • Potassium.
  • Inositol.
  • Boron.

The product is marketed as the best multivitamin for male vegan dieters, partially due to the inclusion of zinc[4] and selenium.[5] These are essential nutrients involved in maintaining reproductive health. Men have dynamic needs throughout their lives, and may also want to consider formulations intended specifically for men over the age of 50

Hippo7 Vegan Complete Multivitamin

Hippo7 Vegan Complete Multivitamin

  • Third-party tested. 
  • GMP-certified facilities. 
  • Specifically formulated to address each nutrient often deficient in vegan diets. 
  • Good value for complete coverage for a vegan diet.
  • The price ($39 for one month) can be expensive, particularly if an existing deficiency is present and multiple supplements are needed. 

Hippo7 Vegan Complete is formulated to match up specifically with the nutritional deficiencies most commonly associated with a vegan lifestyle. The active ingredients are: 

  • Vitamin D, 800 IU.
  • Vitamin B12, 24 mcg.
  • Calcium, 200 mg.
  • Iron, 18 mg.
  • Iodine, 150 mcg.
  • Zinc, 11 mg.
  • DHA, 150 mg.
  • EPA, 75 mg.

This could be considered one of the more potent vegan multivitamin options because of the variety of nutrients included. Along with a healthy diet, Hippo7 Vegan Complete can help avoid some of the more common vitamin and mineral shortages. Similar to other multivitamins, additional supplements may be needed for existing deficiencies. 

DHA and EPA are derived from algae rather than fish, and the inactive ingredients are free of common allergens. 

Hippo7 places a strong emphasis on quality control, using GMP-certified facilities compliant with FDA manufacturing standards. The products are tested by a third-party laboratory to ensure the ingredients are included at the correct strengths and there are no impurities. 

Garden Of Life MyKind Multivitamin

Garden Of Life MyKind Multivitamin

  • Third-party testing.
  • Probiotic component.
  • Environmentally conscious.
  • Proprietary blends.

Similar to Performance Lab, Garden of Life offers a multivitamin with a variety of nutrients but also includes several proprietary blends. A proprietary blend will have a total dose specified but does not provide dosing information for individual ingredients. It’s extremely rare for these blends to be studied for safety and efficacy, and much of the activity would need to be inferred from their individual components. 

These blends may offer some benefits, but without dosing information for individual ingredients, it can be difficult to determine how much of an impact they may have. The ingredients more specific to vegan support include: 

  • Vitamin D, 2000 IU.
  • Vitamin B12, 40.1 mcg.
  • Iron, 1.8 mg.
  • Iodine, 75 mg.
  • Zinc, 7.7 mg.

The ingredients that may have more significance for vegans that are not included outright are calcium, EPA, and DHA. A raw organic fruit and vegetable blend and probiotic blend included in the formula may provide additional value, and the company emphasizes organic and non-GMO products. This focus is what allows this vitamin to be among the best organic vegan multivitamins.

Additional active ingredients include: 

  • Vitamin A.
  • Vitamin C.
  • Vitamin E.
  • Vitamin K. 
  • Thiamin.
  • Riboflavin. 
  • Niacin.
  • Vitamin B6.
  • Folate.
  • Biotin.
  • Pantothenic acid.
  • Selenium.
  • Manganese. 
  • Chromium.
  • Molybdenum.
  • Vitamin K.
  • Lycopene.
  • Vanadium.
  • Raw organic fruit and vegetable blend.
  • Raw probiotic and digestive enzyme blend.
  • Raw antioxidant and immune support blend.

Mary Ruth’s Multivitamin

Mary Ruth's Multivitamin

  • Third-party tested.
  • GMP-certified facilities.
  • Liquid option. 
  • Price; About $45 for a one-month supply for adults.
  • Mixed reviews related to taste. 

For those who would prefer a liquid instead of a tablet or capsule, Mary Ruth’s provides a helpful option. The liquid dosing is also meant to offer a simple way to adjust for different members of the family, with recommendations provided for several age ranges, including children. The liquid is sugar-free and avoids major allergens, but the taste has been received with mixed reviews.  

For individuals following a vegan diet, Mary Ruth’s multivitamins include: 

  • Vitamin D, 800 IU. 
  • Vitamin B12, 12 mcg.
  • Zinc, 1 mg. 

There is a proprietary amino acid complex in the formula with several essential amino acids, including leucine, isoleucine, and valine. These can be helpful for individuals who may have difficulty with protein intake, but it’s important to note that several gaps may still be present for vegan dieters. 

The additional active ingredients are: 

  • Vitamin A.
  • Vitamin C.
  • Vitamin E.
  • Thiamin.
  • Riboflavin.
  • Niacin.
  • Vitamin B6. 
  • Folate.
  • Biotin.
  • Pantothenic acid. 
  • Choline.
  • Chromium.
  • Inositol.
  • Methylsulfonylmethane. 
  • Proprietary branched-chain amino acid complex. 
  • Betaine. 
  • Hesperidin. 

Healthy Cell Vegan Essentials

Healthy Cell Vegan Essentials

  • Third-party testing. 
  • GMP-certified facilities. 
  • Mostly positive reviews related to taste.
  • The price is about $50 for a one-month supply.

Healthy Cell Vegan Essentials provides another alternative to standard tablets and capsules with a gel packet. The gel contains no wheat gluten or other common allergens and its taste has been well-received overall. The active ingredients are comprehensive and compare well with other multivitamins. 

Vegan-specific support includes each of the primary: 

  • Vitamin D, 1600 IU.
  • Vitamin B12, 19.2 mcg. 
  • Iron 2.3 mg.
  • Iodine 150 mcg.
  • Zinc 11 mg. 
  • Omega 3-6-9 fatty acids – this is a source of EPA and DHA despite them not being listed explicitly. 

An amino acid blend is also included for additional support for those who may not be getting adequate protein in their diet. The product is produced with good quality standards and a majority of user experiences have been positive. Additional active ingredients in the formulation include: 

  • Vitamin A. 
  • Vitamin C. 
  • Vitamin E. 
  • Vitamin K. 
  • Thiamine.
  • Riboflavin.
  • Niacin.
  • Vitamin B6.
  • Folate.
  • Biotin.
  • Pantothenic acid.
  • Magnesium.
  • Selenium.
  • Manganese.
  • Chromium.
  • Molybdenum.
  • Oat soluble fiber.
  • Choline.

What Are The Most Important Supplements For Vegans?

A vegan diet can be beneficial for overall health, but it’s important to be aware of the nutrients that may be more difficult to find in plant-based foods. If you believe you may not be getting enough of these nutrients from your diet alone, supplements can help. Let’s talk in some more detail about the dietary components those living a vegan lifestyle may benefit most from supplementing. 

Vitamin B12

Vitamin B12[6] is primarily found in animal products and is sometimes included in supplements under the names cyanocobalamin or methyl cobalamin. Plant foods are not a natural source of vitamin B12, but there are some fortified foods like cereals that provide it as an additive. Vitamin B12 is often included in B complex supplements, which are popular among those seeking improved energy levels. 

Vitamin B12 can help lower the risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease, and dementia. 

Vitamin D

Vitamin D[7] can be made in the body through exposure to sunlight, but it can be particularly difficult for those living in northern regions to make adequate amounts. It can be found in fish, but not many foods provide vitamin D naturally, so it’s sometimes used as an additive. Avoiding deficiencies in vitamin D can help lower the risk of osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, depression, obesity, and type 2 diabetes.

EPA And DHA

Omega-3 Fatty Acids providing EPA and DHA[8] are provided in several sources, with fish being the most abundant source. These are beneficial for cardiovascular disease, early childhood health and neurological development, cancer prevention, and lower risks of cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s or dementia.

Calcium

Calcium[9] is primarily supplied by dairy products in standard diets, but some vegetables like kale, broccoli, and bok choy have significant amounts. Calcium is beneficial for bone health, cancer, and cardiovascular disease.

Iron

Iron[10] is available in some legumes and certain vegetables like potatoes, but the richest natural sources are lean meats and seafood. Iron is crucial for the hemoglobin in red blood cells that carries oxygen throughout our body to be used by organs and tissue. Adequate iron intake prevents anemia. 

Zinc

Zinc[11] is sometimes found in products like fortified cereals, but similar to iron, the most prolific dietary sources are seafood and meats. Zinc helps maintain a healthy immune system and lowers the risks of age-related macular degeneration and type 2 diabetes. 

Iodine

Iodine[12] can be found in seaweed and nori seaweed is a particularly rich source of iodine. Iodine is also found in enriched bread, fish, dairy products, and perhaps most famously, iodized table salt. It is crucial for healthy thyroid function and early childhood development. 

What Nutrients Do Plant-Based Diets Provide?

In contrast, a vegan diet[2] provides comparatively higher levels of:

  • Thiamine, or vitamin B1. 
  • Pyridoxine, or vitamin B6. 
  • Vitamin C. 

These components may be less important to include in a supplement because they are more readily available in a plant-based diet. Their inclusion would also be unlikely to cause toxicity, however. 

How To Choose The Best Vegan Multivitamin?

Customer Reviews

The specific combinations of ingredients in many over-the-counter supplements are not studied directly, so there is some value in reading about customer experiences. These can give you some insight into potential side effects they experienced or whether individual consumers felt the product worked for them. These can also provide a helpful picture related to customer service experiences and whether companies are responsive and actively back up their product once it has been purchased. 

An important thing to keep in mind is that reviews displayed on the manufacturer’s website are included at the manufacturer’s discretion. These are likely to be an extended form of marketing and are often overwhelmingly positive. 

It can be helpful to find authorized third-party vendors and read customer reviews there. These reviews are less likely to be filtered and may give you more of a full picture related to user experience. 

Indicators Of Quality

While price and individual customer experiences can provide a helpful picture of value, it’s also important to watch for signs of manufacturing quality. Two signs of quality that can be particularly helpful are good manufacturing practices or GMP-certified facilities and submissions for third-party laboratory testing. Each of the above products uses both of these quality measures. 

GMP certification implies the facilities used to manufacture the supplements are up to FDA standards. The FDA sets forth these standards to address the cleanliness and maintenance of the facility, as well as ingredient storage parameters. It’s important to note that the FDA isn’t directly evaluating over-the-counter products – these standards apply to the facility itself. 

The absence of an FDA warning letter in a manufacturer’s history, along with GMP certification, is a sign a product is produced in a reliable facility. 

Because the FDA does not evaluate over-the-counter products directly, many products contain substances that are not on the label.[13] At times, this has appeared to be intentional, such as the use of sildenafil in products for erectile dysfunction or steroids in products marketed for building muscle mass. Of course, this is a potential cause of harm because individuals may not be aware of what they are taking. 

There are also times in which an ingredient is included on the label but isn’t actually present in the product at all. Independent third-party testing ensures accurate labeling in terms of ingredients and dosage. It also detects any contaminants that may have affected products unintentionally. 

Conclusion

A vegan diet can be healthy, but it can make some specific nutrients a bit harder to come by. As would be expected, a significant source of these nutrients has traditionally been animal products. The best vegan multivitamins provide these nutrients to help you fill the gaps. 

Multivitamins are meant to provide generalized support for avoiding deficiencies. They are unlikely to provide doses adequate to treat an existing deficiency. Staying up to date with your healthcare providers can help you identify any potential concerns and develop a personalized plan. 

As with any over-the-counter supplement, it’s important to watch for signs of quality to ensure you receive a consistent, reliable product. 

Frequently Asked Questions

Are vegan vitamins effective?

While a multivitamin may not necessarily provide direct support for treating certain conditions, it can be a good option for addressing some deficiencies in your nutrition. 

Can vegans survive without supplements?

Yes, but maintaining adequate nutrition over time does require careful planning. 

What vitamins do vegans lack most?

Vitamin D and vitamin B12 can be more difficult to obtain in a vegan diet. 

How to get all vitamins as a vegan?

A plant-based diet can deliver all essential nutrients, but it does require some attention to detail when planning snacks and meals. A multivitamin can help bridge some of the potential gaps. 

+ 13 Sources

EHproject has strict sourcing guidelines and relies on peer-reviewed studies, academic research institutions, and medical associations. We work mostly with peer-reviewed studies to ensure accurate information. We avoid using tertiary references. You can learn more about how we ensure our content is accurate and current by reading our editorial policy.

  1. Melina, V., Craig, W.J. and Levin, S. (2016). Position of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Vegetarian Diets. Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, [online] 116(12), pp.1970–1980. doi:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jand.2016.09.025.
  2. Neufingerl, N. and Eilander, A. (2021). Nutrient Intake and Status in Adults Consuming Plant-Based Diets Compared to Meat-Eaters: A Systematic Review. Nutrients, [online] 14(1), pp.29–29. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14010029.
  3. Bioavailability and conversion of plant based sources of omega-3 fatty acids – a scoping review to update supplementation options for vegetarians and vegans. (2022). Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition. [online] doi:https://doi.org/10.1080//10408398.2021.1880364.
  4. Allouche-Fitoussi, D. and Breitbart, H. (2020). The Role of Zinc in Male Fertility. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, [online] 21(20), pp.7796–7796. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms21207796.
  5. Albaraa Mojadadi, Lai, A., Salah, W., Witting, P.K. and Ahmad, G. (2021). Role for Selenium in Metabolic Homeostasis and Human Reproduction. Nutrients, [online] 13(9), pp.3256–3256. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13093256.
  6. Nih.gov. (2016). Office of Dietary Supplements – Vitamin B12. [online] Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Vitaminb12-HealthProfessional/.
  7. Nih.gov. (2015). Office of Dietary Supplements – Vitamin D. [online] Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/VitaminD-HealthProfessional/.
  8. Nih.gov. (2015). Office of Dietary Supplements – Omega-3 Fatty Acids. [online] Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Omega3FattyAcids-HealthProfessional/.
  9. Nih.gov. (2014). Office of Dietary Supplements – Calcium. [online] Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/calcium-HealthProfessional/.
  10. Nih.gov. (2015). Office of Dietary Supplements – Iron. [online] Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/iron-HealthProfessional/.
  11. Nih.gov. (2016). Office of Dietary Supplements – Zinc. [online] Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/zinc-healthprofessional/.
  12. Nih.gov. (2019). Office of Dietary Supplements – Iodine. [online] Available at: https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/Iodine-HealthProfessional/.
  13. Tucker, J., Fischer, T., Upjohn, L., Mazzera, D.M. and Kumar, M. (2018). Unapproved Pharmaceutical Ingredients Included in Dietary Supplements Associated With US Food and Drug Administration Warnings. JAMA network open, [online] 1(6), pp.e183337–e183337. doi:https://doi.org/10.1001/jamanetworkopen.2018.3337.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Matthew Sommers is a clinical pharmacist with more than 10 years of experience in the pharmacy profession. He has most recently transitioned from a leadership role in a community setting into clinical practice with a focus… See More